Focus on the Glenorchy Cenotaph

There are 281 names on the Glenorchy cenotaph. Of those, 53 lost their lives in WW I. Mapgrip has found 23 images and some of the stories. Have you got an image or photo?
Tap the the drop down menu to find the names of the remaining 30 soldiers then upload using the web platform or download the app.

T J BEARD
E BUTLER
D B COOPER
W H COOPER
P DICKENSON
W CADD
E C GREEN
S HINCHCLIFFE
S F HINCHCLIFFE
R H JOHNSON
M W MAZEY
C MEARS
S C O’BRIEN
C C PATERSON
PATERSON
S D PEARCE
A H A PIERCE
H A PETTERD
E J POWELL MM
J PURCELL
H PYE
R L REARDON
P E REED
A T SALE
A N SCOLLICK
C W STANSALL
H C TILYARD
H A WARD
J V WHITE
W E WOODWARD
T YOUNG
  • Charles William Hay

    Charles was a mechanical engineer prior to enlistment on 11 January 1915, and was promoted to Lieutenant in February 1918. At the age of 32, Lt Hay was killed when his Sopwith Camel (B. 7461) crashed into the sea off the coast of Montrose, Scotland on 8 April 1918.

    Mr. and Mrs. C. Hay 39 Burnett Street, Hobart, have received official information of the death of their only son.. He met his death on April 8, through his machine diving into the sea off the Scottish coast. Lieut. Hay was very well known and was extremely popular among a wide circle of friends.

  • William Charles Delaney

    Under a continous heavy barrage Private Delaney attended to many of our wounded and carried them to the Regimental Aid Post in full view of the enemy. This gallant man repeatedly carried them the wounded, absolutely regardless of all personal danger, working continuously and although badly shaken he refused to rest.

    By his untiring efforts and gallantry he undoubtedly saved the lives of several of his comrades his splendid devotion to duty together with his cheerful readiness greatly inspired the whole Battalion.

  • Victor Arthur Jacques

    Victor was the son of Samuel William and Susannah Jacques (nee Gordon) an orchardist he embarked Hobart 20th October 1914.

    His parents, living in Chapel St, Glenorchy were notified of Victor’s death in 1918. He had received an official notification that his son had been mentioned in despatches for distinguished and gallant services rendered during the period of General Sir Charles Munro’s command of the Mediterranean Expcditionary Force

  • Charles Eugene Kingston
    France, 20/8/18. I have now before me the very hard task of communicating to you the details of your son’s death in action on the 11th August, 1918. I say that it is a hard task, because it is so hard to realise that such a fine young man should have gone. Of your son’s splendid character I will not speak. The highest words of praise would be insufficient and unfitting for your son. On the morning of the now historic 11th August our battalion attacked and beat the Hun badly on the Somme, and after we had gained all of our objectives and were consolidating our position, your son volunteered for a rather dangerous and difficult job, that of patrolling our front. It was while so engaged that your son lost his life, being shot by a German sniper. He was always cheery, no matter how hard the conditions, how terrifying the danger, always popular with those with whom he came in touch. We have good cause to regret the loss of such a fine soldier and so splendid a comrade. Again expressing my deepest sympathy with you in the great loss you have sustained.

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